panel-technojam

Sponsors - Pinnacle

Pinnacle

sponsor intel 

Sponsors - Diamond

Diamond

sponsor microsoft 

Diamond

sponsor csc 

Diamond

sponsor xerox 

Sponsors - Platinum

Platinum

sponsor opentext 

Platinum

sponsor amd 

Platinum

sponsor blackberry 

Platinum

sponsor dassault 

Platinum

sponsor sasktel 

Platinum

sponsor sasktel 

Platinum

sponsor cgi 

Platinum

sponsor softchoice2 

Platinum

sponsor cisco 

Sponsors - Gold

Gold

sponsor sasktel 

Gold

sponsor dell 

Gold

sponsor canon 

Gold

sponsor bell 

Gold

sponsor invest quebec en 

Gold

sponsor cisa 

Gold

sponsor sap 

Gold

sponsor tibco 

Sponsors - Silver

Silver

sponsor saskpower 

Silver

sponsor ontariocanada 

Silver

sponsor ictam 

Silver

sponsor saskatchewan en 

Silver

partner canieti 

Silver

partner assespro 

Silver

sponsor google 

Silver

sponsor tata 

Sponsors - Bronze

Bronze

sponsor sasktel 

Bronze

sponsor dell 

Bronze

sponsor edc 

Bronze

partner cessi 

Bronze

sponsor sshrc 

Bronze

sponsor avaya 

Bronze

sponsor outsourcing malaysia 

An evening stroll through Old Montréal

You would like to take advantage of your trip to discover the City of Montréal, but time may be short? Don’t worry, the Palais des congrès de Montréal is connected by an underground pedestrian walkway to the city's main attractions, including the business hub, the international district, the show district, Chinatown, and Old Montréal.

In this section, we will recommend a route that will allow you to discover the main attractions of Old Montréal during the evening. This is the time of day when the historical buildings of Montréal shine in all their splendour. The lighting has been specially designed to enhance the beauty of the architectural detail of these buildings that have endured through the centuries. The warm colours of dusk bring together the natural hues of the stones, effectively highlighting the diverse styles that stand side-by-side in this area.

The best way to see the city is on foot, so lace up your sneakers and set off to discover the European charm of Old Montréal.

  1. The Palais des congrès de Montréal
  2. Notre-Dame Basilica
  3. Place d’Armes
  4. Saint-Sulpice Seminary
  5. Sainte-Hèlène and des Récollets Streets
  6. Saint-Paul Street
  7. Centre d’histoire de Montréal
  8. Place d’Youville
  9. Pointe-à-Callière: Archaeology and History Museum
  10. Place Royale
  11. Cours Le Royer (Hôtel-Dieu stores)
  12. Quays at the Old Port of Montréal
  13. Place Jacques Cartier
  14. City Hall
  15. Marché Bonsecours
  16. Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours Chapel

  1. The Palais des congrès de Montréal
    The unique architecture of the Palais is defined by the rainbow coloured exterior that comprises 332 colored glass panels and 58 transparent glass panels, flooding the interior with a luminous, pleasant, energizing atmosphere. Another distinctive feature: Claude Cormier's highly original and colourful Lipstick Forest features 52 pink trees made of concrete. This surrealist installation produced by sculptors from the Aquanov Group is intended to represent the trees that line Montréal’s Park Avenue. Learn more about the architecture or the landscaping of the Palais des congrès de Montréal.
  2. Notre-Dame Basilica
    A masterpiece of Gothic Revival architecture, Notre-Dame Basilica was built between 1824 and 1829. The magnificent wooden interior and the boldly modern design of the Notre-Dame-du-Sacré-Coeur Chapel captivate hundreds of thousands of visitors every year. Paintings, sculptures and stained-glass windows illustrate biblical passages, as well as 350 years of parish history. In the evening, a sound and light show depicts the founding of Montréal and the Basilica.
  3. Place d’Armes
    Originally built at the end of the 17th century, Place d’Armes has become a prestigious address in Montréal. The surrounding buildings are remarkable mementos of the major milestones in the city’s history. A statue of Paul de Chomedey, “Sieur de Maisonneuve”, the founder of Montréal, has stood in the centre of the square since 1895.
  4. Saint-Sulpice Seminary
    The “Vieux Séminaire” is the oldest building in Montréal. It was built between 1684 and 1687, and then extended 20 years later by the Messrs of Saint-Sulpice who ran the Notre-Dame parish. They were “seigneurs” of the island of Montréal for nearly two centuries. This historical structure is a prime example of institutional architecture in New France. Its clock, which dates back to 1701, may be the oldest of its kind in North America.
  5. Sainte-Hèlène and des Récollets Streets
    This is one of the most beautiful Victorian business districts in North America. Everywhere you look, graceful grey stone façades attract your gaze, as did the warehouse-stores with customers in days past. These warehouse-salesrooms, which date from the 1850s to the 1880s, were used to receive, store and showcase both imported and domestic products.
  6. Saint-Paul Street
    For years, Saint-Paul Street was Montréal’s main street. Many of the buildings, which date from the 19th century and include several warehouses, have been renovated, and today serve as boutiques, artists’ studios and even homes. The street overflows with warm, inviting restaurants. Busy nightclubs and jazz clubs add spice to the nightlife in the neighbourhood. The cobblestone street, particularly east of Saint-Laurent Boulevard, is crowded with horse-drawn carriages.
  7. Centre d’histoire de Montréal
    The Centre d’histoire de Montréal hands you the key to Montréal’s multiple identities. With three floors and as many exhibitions, you’ll live or re-live the rich and eventful history of the metropolis through sound environments, spectacular images, visual effects, personal testimonies and intriguing artefacts.
  8. Place d’Youville
    Built above the bed of the Little Saint-Pierre River, which was canalized in 1832, Place d’Youville features a stunning synthesis of history. An obelisk on the site recalls its first pioneers. On the south side, between Normand and Saint-Pierre Streets, you can see the former hospital of the Grey Nuns, part of which dates back to 1693. Buildings from the 1870s and the beginning of the 20th century underscore the importance of this business hub situated in close proximity to the port. The site of the Grande Paix de Montréal (1701) is located between the Centre d’histoire and Pointe-à-Callière.
  9. Pointe-à-Callière: Archaeology and History Museum
    Pointe-à-Callière, the Montréal Museum of Archaeology and History, is a national historic site and the birthplace of Montréal. Built atop actual remains, it provides visitors with a genuine archaeological tour as they discover the first public square, the vaulted canalization of the Saint-Pierre River, the first Catholic cemetery and much more. Advanced technology and a multimedia show projected above the ruins depict Montréal's past in a new light. The contemporary structure of the Pointe-à-Callière museum is linked to the Old Customs House by an underground archeological circuit, which explains why part of Place Royale is elevated.
  10. Place Royale
    This was the location of the marketplace in the 17th and 18th centuries.
  11. Cours Le Royer (Hôtel-Dieu stores)
    Many large buildings-warehouse-stores that were erected in the 1860s and 70s eloquently attest to the commercial vitality of the area during the industrialization of the city. The boutiques that were built at that time on the former site of Hôtel-Dieu are a striking example of technological innovation combined with refined architectural style. This is the first major example of contemporary reuse of an ancient commercial sector. Today, the buildings serve as offices, businesses and residences.
  12. Quays at the Old Port of Montréal
    A 2.7 km park and tourist destination, the Quays of the Old Port are home to a wide array of outdoor activities and services for all tastes: cruises and excursions, paddle boating, quadricycling, a maze, a water spa, exhibits, shows, restaurants. This location also boasts a wide variety of indoor activities at the Montréal Science Centre and the IMAX TELUS theatre. In the winter, the Quays feature Montréal’s largest outdoor skating rink, and are the site of exciting events such as Igloofest, TELUS Fire on Ice, the Montréal HIGH LIGHTS Festival, the Montréal All-Nighter winter party, and Pointe-à-Callière’s Port Symphonies.
  13. Place Jacques Cartier
    In the heart of Old Montréal, the gentle slope down from the Nelson monument affords a superb view of the Old Port. Built in 1804 and restored in 1998 on the old site of Château de Vaudreuil, Place Jacques-Cartier was used as a public market for many years. A major gathering place and entertainment site in Old Montréal, it draws passers-by and visitors who enjoy street artists, roving entertainers, face painters and caricaturists. Victorian street lamps and a flower market stall add to the charming ambiance. Facing City Hall, Place De La Dauversière is a magnificent public garden that was restored in 1997.
  14. City Hall
    Montréal’s City Hall has a more turbulent history than its peaceful façade suggests. The building was erected between 1872 and 1878, and survived a severe fire in 1922. And this was the balcony from which French President General de Gaulle uttered his famous words “Vive le Québec libre!” (Long live free Québec) during a state visit in 1967. Take a moment to admire the Hall of Honour, or better yet, sign up for a guided tour. The view at dusk is absolutely spectacular when City Hall is lit up.
  15. Marché Bonsecours
    The Marché Bonsecours was inaugurated in 1847. A symbol of Montréal’s heyday, this imposing building was the city’s main agricultural marketplace for more than a century. It also housed a concert hall, and even served as City Hall. Its symmetrical composition and Greek Revival portico (the cast-iron columns were brought from England), tin-plated dome and simple and varied details make it a perfect illustration of the neo-classical style that was in vogue at the time. Recent renovations have once again turned it into a bustling marketplace that boasts sidewalk cafés, shops and exhibitions.
  16. Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours Chapel
    This 300-year old chapel and its captivating history museum will amaze you! As you move through the exhibition rooms, including the magnificent crypt and the tower that offers a spectacular view of Old Montréal, you will find yourself covering more than 2,000 years of history. Of special interest: the tomb of Sainte Marguerite Bourgeoys, the tower lookout, and the archaeological site.

Sources: Toursime Montréal, Le Circuit lumière du Vieux-Montréal, official site of Old Montréal